Standing Stone Brewing Company

Events

Happy November! Pints for a Purpose 2015/2016

Fall is here and we are very excited to announce the 2015/2016 recipients for our Pints for a Purpose program. For those unfamiliar with Pints for a Purpose, let us explain. Each year, we invite local nonprofits to submit applications on behalf of their organizations and we as a staff vote to choose our top five favorites. November through March each group is awarded their own special evening, and from 5-10 p.m. $2 of every pint of beer sold goes straight to their organizations. We invite the group’s representatives to spend the evening with us, and share a pint as they answer questions, and offer information as to who they are and what they do. Here is the lineup for this year:

friends of library

November 10- Sanctuary One

Sanctuary One provides a safe home to rescued farm animals and house pets. The farm includes expansive gardens which not only provide rich vegetables and food for the animals, but opportunities for growth of the people who tend them.

December 1- Bee Girl

To inspire and empower communities to conserve bees and their habitat. Bee Girl, a nonprofit organization founded by Sarah Red-Laird, aims to conserve our bees by educating the public on their importance through programs focused on community classes and events, public lectures, and their Kids and Bees program. 

January 12- Children’s Advocacy Center of Jackson County

To meet the needs of children and families in our community by providing a community-based, child-focused center that facilitates a compassionate, multi-disciplinary approach to the prevention, treatment, identification, investigation, and prosecution of child abuse.

February 9Rogue Valley Farm to School waterwatch

Rogue Valley Farm to School educates children about our food system through hands-on farm and garden programs, and by increasing local foods in school meals.

March 9- No LNG Campaign 

No LNG Exports Oregon is a statewide coalition of activists, experts, and community members with the goal of stopping two LNG pipeline projects in Oregon.

So there you have it! Last year, we raised over $2,300 (that’s 1,150 pints!) benefitting five different wonderful nonprofits including, Rogue Climate, Water Watch of Oregon, Friends of the Ashland Public Library, Rogue Farm Corps and Rogue Valley Earth Day. We are very happy to continue with the tradition and hope you join us at one (or all) of our Pints for a Purpose evenings this season.

7th Annual Pumpkins & Pints

farm2

Mark your calendar, hold all phone calls, and reschedule all meetings. Pumpkins and Pints is Sunday, October 25th from 12pm-5pm. This annual autumn get-together started with a small group of Standing Stone employees who gathered at the brewpub in October to carve pumpkins with their families. Years later, it has grown to be our biggest event of the year. In 2014 we welcomed hundreds of guests to our farm to carve pumpkins, enjoy BBQ and beer, play games, run amok, and help us celebrate a beautiful southern Oregon day (last year was sunny and 70 degrees). We invite you to come help us do the same in 2015!

hay balesHere’s what’s on the books for this year: weather permitting, we’ll hold the event at One Mile Farm, just down the road from Standing Stone. We’ll provide the pumpkins and carving tools (you’re welcome to bring your own if you take pumpkin carving really seriously), and you just show up with your creative ideas. You can purchase beer, hard cider, lemonade, brats and burgers once you’ve worked up a hearty appetite. We’ll have live music with Swift Pony and Special Guest Sam Cathcart (you can visit their new music store, Hilltop Music Shop, in Ashland) and games to keep kids of all ages entertained.

To get to the farm, follow Oak Street from Standing Stone to the very bottom, where it meets Eagle Mill Road. Take a right, go under the overpass, and find the entrance to our farm immediately after the bridge on the left side of the road. Limited parking is available on the roadside, so we suggest biking to the event to take advantage of front-row, two-wheeled parking inside our pasture. And if these directions are just too confusing, plug in the farm address to your Maps app: 1469 Eagle Mill Road in Ashland.

pastureIf the weather turns sour, our PLAN B is bringing all the pumpkins back to Standing Stone for an indoor/patio event at the brewpub. We’ll call the weather one week prior (check back here or on our social media pages), so you’ll know well in advance where to find us. If the week before is wet, but the event day is sunny, we’ll do it all on the patio outside at the brewpub to avoid the mud and still get some fall-fresh air.

The event is free and family-friendly! And if the weather lets us play at the farm, dogs on leashes are welcome, too. We’re excited to see you all elbow-deep scraping seeds and creating great jack-o-lanterns. Bring along your farm boots and cozy clothes, and we’ll all have some good, old-fashioned autumn time fun!

By in Community, Events, Food 0

Get Your Fill During Eat Local Week, 9/11-9/20

buy local buy rogueWe’ll join just about any celebration dedicated to food and/or beer, and it’s even better if it’s featuring fresh, local goods. We’re excited to join Thrive’s annual Eat Local Week, September 11-20, alongside lots of other southern Oregon businesses. It’s a week of eating, drinking, and enjoying our region’s local bounty. What more could we ask for?

Thrive (The Rogue Initiative for a Vital Economy) is southern Oregon’s resource for connecting local businesses and producers. They organize educational events all year long, and encourage local food production and consumption. We’ve been members for years, and always jump at the opportunity to create a new special in honor of the Eat Local Week Celebration.

Here’s what we have in store for our locally-themed menu special, available 9/11-9/20:

One Mile Farm Beef Burger on Potato Focaccia with Mama Terra Goat Cheese, Tulelake Horseradish & Fire-Roasted Barking Moon Farm Peppers. Served with Fry Family Farms Potato Chips

tomatoesYou can get involved in several ways, too. Dine at the restaurants listed online with local specials, and match them with local wine and beer where you can! Join any of the Eat Local Week classes, and get some education with your meal. Visit special events all week long, including the Tomato Taste-Off at the Grants Pass Growers Market, Jackson County Harvest Festival in Central Point, or the Salsa Showdown at the Saturday Growers Market in Medford.

If you’re camera-savvy, we also suggest checking out this year’s Selfie Photo Contest. Take a shot of yourself riding the blender bicycle at the Salsa Showdown, meeting animals at the Rogue Flavor Farm Tour, or making dinner at home with all local ingredients. Visit their website for contest instructions, and use #EatLocalRogue all week long.

Valley-wide, there’s plenty to do and eat all week long! Grab your food-loving friends and make plans to cruise around southern Oregon on a local cuisine adventure. We hope to see you at Standing Stone, around town and beyond, filling your belly with our area’s abundant, delicious goods.

Why We Run

White Pasty Legs

Avert your gaze, you may go blind from the reflecting light (photo courtesy of R. Koning).

Nick gives us a glimpse at what the Wild Rogue Relay entails.  So sit down, grab a cold beer and read about other people working hard.  Because, really, that’s the best way to enjoy work.

When the Standing Stone running team (a.k.a Slaughterhouse 12) came to me last year and asked me to run in the Wild Rogue Relay, I was more than a little apprehensive about it.  Running long distances ranks somewhere near doing my taxes and cleaning my cat’s litter box in regards to things I would like to spend my time doing.

I’ve always excused myself from such activities by saying I was more of a sprinter, but, while true, it really had more to do with boredom. I’ve always felt running is a lot of the same thing: start running on pavement for 10 minutes, then move on to some running on gravel for 10 minutes, with a little trail running for about 10 minutes and finally, the run is capped off with a nice jaunt on pavement for 10 more minutes (just in case you missed it). There’s no Frisbee I’m chasing or “Free Beer” vendor I’m desperately sprinting towards, pint in hand.  In fact, all of those things I love about sprinting are perhaps the worst thing you can do while running distance, as you’ll likely injure yourself or run out of energy before you finish the run.  I have a newfound understanding for dogs on leashes, or stuck in cars; constantly waiting to be let loose and feel the exhilaration of running at full speed.

So you can understand my – what would you call it, complete and utter lack of any sort of interest in regards to any run that goes on for longer that two or three blocks?  Compound all of that with the fact that I work at a brewery – one that specializes in fried goodness and delicious desserts – and you’ve got the makings of one very unhappy runner.

And then I ran the Relay last year…

Truck Side

Getting Truck #1 ready for the next exchange (photo courtesy of L. Pfister)

…and confirmed pretty much everything I thought about running.  That crap is hard.  Each runner ran between 16 and 24 miles over the course of 34 hours.  Some runs were in the sweltering heat of the afternoon, while others took place in the eerie calm coolness of midnight.  None of the runners slept more than two or three hours during the event, testing the stamina and patience of everyone in the vans; because, let’s be honest, spending 30 hours straight in a vehicle with five other people lacking sleep has its ramifications.

Handoff Alex Nick

(photo courtesy of R. Koning)

That said, when I finished the relay, I found a part of me that I never knew existed: I was a distance runner.  And I had amazing teammates/co-workers/friends.  Of all the places I’ve had the pleasure (or displeasure) to work, Standing Stone has offered me some of the closest, lasting friendships I’ve ever had.  What kind of restaurant has twelve employees who enjoy each other’s company so much they’d actively choose to spend 30 hours straight with them, in the tight confines of a mini van where their only relief comes in the form of a seven mile run?

All of the excuses I made not to run were just that: excuses. I ran 18.1 miles, split in three different legs, without walking once.  This is coming from someone who hadn’t done a distance run since sophomore year P.E. (and failed miserably, I might add).

Why do people run in the first place? It’s a question I asked myself every time I spotted a sweaty runner while enjoying a nice, cold pint at the bar.  I ran not to have a good time, or to stay in shape,  or because I wanted to. I ran because they needed another runner and I was free.  All of my fears surfaced exactly how I expected: it was difficult, I was tired and, yes, I had visions of lounging by the pool with an ice-cold margarita in one hand and another ice-cold margarita in the other.  But something changed once I finished. I ran in the relay again this year because it was arduous.  Some of the best things in life are those that we have to grit our teeth for; to bear down and fight for that last reserve of energy.  It’s a wonderful feeling to complete something so grueling and terribly hard.

Truck 1 Night Shot

(photo courtesy of J. Donehower)

The satisfaction I felt for running that last fifty feet of my final leg was unlike anything else I’ve experienced, because I hit my limit a mile back but kept going. Anytime I wavered, my teammates would come through for me.  Whenever I’d feel that pang of pain biting at my motivation, my crew would summit a hill with Ride of the Valkyries blasting from a loud speaker Mad-Max-style-strapped to the top of a Ford F-250, and temporarily the Rogue River canyons would turn into my own personal concert hall.

Do I like distance running? Heavens, no.  I will, however, be running in the Wild Rogue Relay again next year. It was difficult, but it was also a blast. But naturally, I’ve gone into retirement: I need to make up for all these race-conscious decisions I’ve been making and eat a piece cheesecake with a pint or two, or thirty, to wash it down.

Photo Recap: Wild Rogue Relay

IMG_2126Last Thursday, before the Wild Rogue Relay

Rachel: “I’m so excited for the Wild Rogue Relay! I’m totally ready for a vacation.”

Danielle: “Oh, Rachel…This isn’t a vacation.”

Sure, we were exhausted after running 224 collective miles from Applegate Lake to Brookings, Oregon. Was it worth it? Absolutely. We raced along lakesides, orchards, rivers and beaches over 34 hours. We ran through mountains in the middle of the night and along the sand in the heat of the day. We came, we saw, we conquered, and we’re only still slightly sore from the efforts.

Our Slaughterhouse 12 team beat last year’s personal race time by three minutes with an additional 10 miles added to the course in 2015. We like to think we’re in better shape this year, but maybe it was the fear of cougars in the middle of the night that kept us moving quickly. Either way, we were happy to come in as #31 out of 80 finishing teams!

We want to send a huge thanks to the race organizers and all the volunteers at the check points and finish line. The exchanges went smoothly, the free coffee from Dutch Bros. was essential, and the after party was a blast. Standing Stone poured Double IPA, Commuter Gold, Milk & Honey, and Hefeweizen to quench racers’ post-run thirsts. Our apologies to all for running out of beer – turns out those racers were thirsty after running for two days – and thank you to Chetco Brewing for bringing over a keg ASAP to help us keep serving!

After all the running and sleep-deprived delirium, we’d do it again in a heartbeat. And we will! Look out for our team next year, racing to the finish line of the Wild Rogue Relay and pouring beer for all at the end.

By the way…the guy in the red cape in our group photo? We have no idea who he is. Well done photo-crasher, wherever you are!

(photos: R. Koning, Laura Pfister)

Racing to the Coast in the Wild Rogue Relay, 6/19

wrr_logoWhat was that super fast blue flash that just went by? Oh, you know, probably just one of the racers on our Wild Rogue Relay team! (Or maybe someone threw a Smurf). We’re back for our third year in this 220 mile relay race, and our Slaughterhouse 12 team has been training for months to run all the way to the Oregon coast and pour beer at the finish.

The Wild Rogue Relay starts at Applegate Lake in Southern Oregon and winds along rivers, country roads, mountain passes, and beaches to the finish line in Brookings, Oregon. There are winery stops along the way, and Dutch Bros. coffee tents to energize those sleepy middle-of-the-night racers. Our 12 teammates will each run three legs averaging between 17-25 miles total, over the course of 30+ hours! (Okay, so maybe we’re not so fast after all.) Here’s the line up of Standing Stone athletes toeing the line:

Group #1: Maire, Rachel, Laura, Nick, Alex, John

Group #2: Gina, Alecia, Josh, Suzanne, Danielle, Chuck

Good luck everyone! After the race, Standing Stone is pouring beer for all the particiants at the finish line in Azalea Park, Brookings. If you’re racing, be sure to bring your race number and ID to the beer trailer. All runners get a free pint and logo’d glass, and we’ll sell extra pints to fans, groupies, visitors, and – frankly – anyone of age who wants to toast a beer with WRR frameus!

Finishers will also find post-race grub, live music and vendors at the end, and camping nearby for those so-inclined. Personally, we’re thinking a soft bed and hot tub might be in order.

Oh, and back to that “blue flash” comment in the beginning…you’ll spot us wearing matching logo’d blue running wear along the route. Because, let’s face it, a team race is just a little more fun with matching schwag. We’re excited to debut this year’s Slaughterhouse 12 design…we’ll post photos along the way.

For now, back to the training. With just a week to go there are trails to run, bags to pack, food to buy, beer to transport…

By in Brewery & Beer, Events 0

American Craft Beer Week Celebrates 10th Year, May 11-17

From California to New York Island, from the redwood forest to the Gulf stream waters, beer lovers everywhere will celebrate the country’s small and independent craft brewery renaissance during American Craft Beer Week (ACBW), May 11-17. All 50 states will hold events including exclusive brewery tours, special craft beer releases, food and beer pairings, tap takeovers and more to honor the ever-advancing craft beer culture and unite tens of thousands of beer lovers nationwide.

“American Craft Beer Week has provided independent beer fans across the country a chance to support their local breweries since 2006,” said Julia Herz, publisher of CraftBeer.com and craft beer program director at the Brewers Association. “With celebrations happening in all 50 states, this is truly an annual national event that recognizes all those involved in making craft beer from small breweries in the U.S. such a success.”

In the spirit of celebration this year, CraftBeer.com created an interactive graphic with fun facts to commemorate each state and their commitment to craft brewing. Check it out on their website to view craft beer happenings and history in your area. acbw15_feature At Standing Stone, Ashland Mayor John Stromberg will join us on Wednesday, May 13th at 6pm to read the 2015 Craft Beer Proclamation. The Ashland City Council adopted the proclamation into their minutes last week, recognizing the significance of the craft beer community and its contributions to our local economy.

We’ll kick up the live-reading by tapping a collaboration beer we joined in making for last month’s Craft Brewers Conference in Portland. Spirit of the 90s is a modern Northwest Amber Ale brewed at Hopworks Urban Brewery in Portland. Other contributors to this brew include Breakside BreweryGilgamesh Brewing,  Laurelwood Brewing Co., Portland Brewing, and Standing Stone. Come toast a pint with us in honor of collaboration and camaraderie in the craft beer community!

To stay in the loop all week long, follow and use #ACBW on Instagram and Twitter, and visit CraftBeer.com for a complete list of events across the U.S.

Nibble & Sip at A Taste of Ashland, 4/25-4/26

For locals and visitors alike, A Taste of Ashland is a not-to-be-missed springtime event. This year the food, wine and gallery tour spans Saturday and Sunday, April 25th and 26th from noon to 4p.m. As usual, Standing Stone will join the fun with food samples to pair with local wines. You’ll find us at Hanson Howard Gallery, just next door at 89 Oak St.

taste of ashland gallery

Fun to be had at Hanson Howard Gallery, 4/25-4/26

A Taste of Ashland is the Ashland Gallery Association’s signature fund-raising event. This annual walking tour of Ashland galleries pairs local restaurants and regional wineries to create a weekend-long pairing experience. Foodies and wine lovers can follow a map to 17 galleries around town, and hop a shuttle if the four-hours-a-day tour calls for a little rest.

This year, we’re thrilled to be paired once again with Simple Machine Wine. Tasters can expect unique wines crafted from Rogue Valley vineyards by winemaker Brian Denner. Check out their history and varietals on Simple Machine’s website.

taste of ashland lamb

A Taste of Ashland 2014: Roasted Lamb with Lavender Sea Salt

As for our food, we’re not going to let that cat out of the bag just yet. There’s tasting to be done, recipes to perfect, ingredients to procure…but we do vow to bring along appetizing food samples from our kitchen right next door. In the past, our wood-fired pizzas, lamb meatballs, and artichoke fondue have all gone over great, and we promise to make this year no exception.

Tickets are available at atasteofashland.com for weekend-long or single-day passes. Wine glass and tour map included, and then you make your own fun! If you need a break during or after your tour, stop by Standing Stone downtown for a pint, meal, and resting place at 101 Oak St. Trust us, we won’t scoff if you kick up your legs and relax – gallery hopping with food and wine is hard work!

Celebrating the Earth (with Beer) at Rogue Valley Earth Day, 4/25

posterWe’re always eager to be a part of Rogue Valley Earth Day, and we’ll join this year’s celebration on Saturday, April 25th at ScienceWorks Hands-On Museum with beer in tow. The annual event runs 11-4pm in the Ashland museum’s outdoor courtyard and lawn, and community members and visitors alike of all ages are encouraged to come join the festivities.

Established in 2001, Rogue Valley Earth Day is a local tradition. It serves as a forum for nonprofits, businesses and governments to raise awareness, a venue for local artists and performers to share talents, and an outlet for students to display knowledge and creativity. Participants can view exhibits and join hands-on activities related to waste prevention, local food and farms, green products and building materials, clean energy options, transportation alternatives, wildlife preservation, and more. Check out more details on their Facebook page.

The best part (in our minds): this is a zero waste event! Come see how a community gathering with over 2,000 visitors can operate without generating garbage. There will be recycling and composting receptacles, and water-fill stations for all of you bringing your own reusable water bottles.

We’ll be pouring beer in our own durable glassware, so you can feel good about drinking your beer and saving the waste! We’ll serve our I ♥ Oregon Ale and a specialty brew in glass pints, and we’ll have a handful of empty-pint glass collection stations around the event. When the day is over, we’ll pack them all up and take them back to the brewery for washing. No waste, lots of delicious craft beer. 

Also, we’re extra excited about this year’s event because Rogue Valley Earth Day was our final beneficiary for our 2014/2015 Pints for a Purpose donation program. We went out with a party last month, raising $2 for every pint of beer sold for this active, long-time local organization. Thanks to everyone who came out on March 3rd to Standing Stone, and we hope to see you again on April 25th for the big event.

Bike, walk, carpool, skip, hop, jump…consider leaving your car home for the day and hightail-it to Rogue Valley Earth Day in gas-saving mode. Once there, settle in with your pint of Standing Stone beer and enjoy the festivities. Let’s face it, celebrating the earth with a craft beer in hand is maybe – just maybe – about as good as it gets. Hope to see you there!

By in Community, Events 0

Pints for a Purpose Benefits Rogue Valley Earth Day, 3/3

posterWe’re rallying-up for our final Pints for a Purpose benefit evening of the 2014/2015 season. From 5-10pm on Tuesday, March 3rd we’ll give $2 for every pint of beer sold at Standing Stone to a nonprofit near-and-dear to our hearts: Rogue Valley Earth Day.  This year, the Earth Day celebration lands on Saturday, April 25th at ScienceWorks Hands-On Museum in Ashland, Oregon. We’re raising some extra funds for this Rogue Valley tradition, and we’d love your help!

Rogue Valley Earth Day is an annual celebration for all ages to learn about environmental stewardship and build community in a fun and inspirational setting. Since 2001, the event has been a forum for nonprofits, businesses and governments to raise awareness; a venue for local musicians, artists and performers to share their talents, and an outlet for students to display their knowledge and creativity.

Visitors will enjoy dozens of exhibits about waste prevention, local food and farms, green products, building materials, clean energy options, transportation alternatives, wildlife preservation, and much more. Check out the live entertainment and hands-on activities, and experience a zero-waste event! Organizers encourage attendees to walk, bike, carpool, or ride the RVTD Route 10 to get to the festivities.

PrintYou’ll also find Standing Stone pouring beer at this year’s event! Stop by for a pint while browsing the vendors and exhibits, or settle in with a cold-one while watching some of the live entertainment. You can learn more about the event or sign up to volunteer at www.RogueValleyEarthDay.net

Mark your calendar, write it on your hand, tie a string around your finger…whatever method you choose for remembering, don’t forget to join us on March 3rd for Pints for a Purpose. We’re going out with a bang for the 2014/2015 donation season, so let’s get some pint-drinking buds together to support Rogue Valley Earth Day!

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